Author Topic: Not In My Name!  (Read 12992 times)

Offline Alan

  • The Newshound
  • Cast Of Thousands
  • ******
  • Posts: 4551
    • View Profile
Not In My Name!
« on: March 21, 2006, 09:24:52 AM »
I am not religious but this made me feel angry particularly as we are in this country upholding these laws.... Not In My Name!

ABDUL RAHMAN, a 41-year-old Afghan, was a Muslim for 25 years before he began working for an international Christian group helping his fellow countrymen in Pakistan. Within a couple of years he had converted to Christianity. Fourteen years later, the decision may cost him his life.
 
Returning to Afghanistan in 2002 he tried to recover his two daughters, now aged 13 and 14, from his parents in Kabul, but they refused to return them, and the parents then denounced him as a convert. Mr Rahman was promptly arrested, and found to possess a Bible. He now languishes in Kabul central prison and will, if convicted of an “attack on Islam”, face the death penalty under Afghanistan’s new constitution.

The prosecutor, Abdul Wasi, has said that he would drop charges if Mr Rahman converted back to Islam, but he has so far refused to do so.

“He would be forgiven if he changed back, but he said he was a Christian and would always remain one . . . We are Muslims and becoming a Christian is against our laws. He must get the death penalty.”

Offline mart2986

  • Bored Teenager
  • ****
  • Posts: 407
    • View Profile
Not In My Name!
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2006, 10:49:05 AM »
So invading them and putting in a new government and legal system did a good job.

Well done Bush and Blair!

Offline Klaus

  • Administrator
  • Cast Of Thousands
  • *****
  • Posts: 3749
    • ICQ Messenger - 47852913
    • View Profile
    • http://www.tvsmith.com
    • Email
Not In My Name!
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2006, 02:19:17 PM »
Quote from: "mart2986"
So invading them and putting in a new government and legal system did a good job.

Well done Bush and Blair!


Excellent job!
"And if our castle should come tumbling down - We'll fix it up again somehow
We can do anything - That' the wonderful thing...

Carrying On"

Offline Alan

  • The Newshound
  • Cast Of Thousands
  • ******
  • Posts: 4551
    • View Profile
Madness
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2006, 08:18:11 PM »
Apparently, the Afghans are after a way out and are proposing that he is insane (otherwise how could you explain it?!) BUT even the 'moderate' imans want his head; Abdul Raoulf, who opposed the Taliban says "He is not mad. The Government are playing games.....This is humilating Islam. Cut off his head."


Nice.

Offline Uli

  • Moderator
  • The Servant
  • *****
  • Posts: 10443
    • View Profile
Not In My Name!
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2006, 11:06:46 AM »
I'd thought are armies invaded that country to get rid of the inhuman regime of the Taliban (and to catch some terrorists)... Now there seems to be another regime which doesn't care about human rights...
Must we bomb them again?  8O
Just around the corner and miles away...

Offline TAFKAK

  • Moderator
  • Bored Teenager
  • *****
  • Posts: 101
    • View Profile
    • Email
Not In My Name!
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2006, 12:44:18 PM »
Quote from: "Uli"
Must we bomb them again?  8O


Definitely! :evil:

Offline Uli

  • Moderator
  • The Servant
  • *****
  • Posts: 10443
    • View Profile
free
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2006, 11:59:13 AM »
The guy's free, so no need to bomb them again...
Still leaves the question of the laws in Afghanistan. Not to mention the mob who was ready to lynch that guy. All blinded by religion...  :(
Just around the corner and miles away...

Offline jock

  • Cast Of Thousands
  • ******
  • Posts: 2953
    • View Profile
    • http://www.mohawks.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/
    • Email
Not In My Name!
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2006, 07:53:12 PM »
Yeh Uli Religion instigates , religion is the root of all evil , well that and MONEY   :evil:  fuck all religion .
Bloody hell !

Offline mart2986

  • Bored Teenager
  • ****
  • Posts: 407
    • View Profile
Not In My Name!
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2006, 02:35:43 PM »
I thought women were the root of all evil.

Money = Time

Women = Time x Money

therefore

Women = Money x Money
Women = Money Squared.

Money = Root of all Evil

Therefore basic maths suggests

Women = Evil

I knew my maths teacher had taught me something useful!

Offline Tj

  • Moderator
  • The Servant
  • *****
  • Posts: 14236
    • View Profile
    • True  Results - People Change for Good
    • Email
Venus!
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2006, 09:40:08 PM »
Hmm.  :?

There's one thing for sure - they're not like blokes! :lol:


 8)
"Deep inside you know it's right to lean towards the light"

Tj Sundown
Leaning towards the Starlight

Offline Uli

  • Moderator
  • The Servant
  • *****
  • Posts: 10443
    • View Profile
women and men
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2006, 06:58:50 AM »
Indeed, Tj...

What I know is that very often it was women who suffered when men reigned. Think of witch hunts, the sharia and all that sort of stuff...  :cry:

There's this "legend" that all evil comes from women - look at the story of Adam and Eve or the one about "Pandora's Box". But I don't think it's true...  :roll:
Just around the corner and miles away...

Offline Alan

  • The Newshound
  • Cast Of Thousands
  • ******
  • Posts: 4551
    • View Profile
Re: Not In My Name!
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2008, 10:16:24 AM »
And again (& I am sure there are many more).....

Islam 'insult' student faces death

KABUL A journalism student has been sentenced to death in Afghanistan for distributing a paper that allegedly insulted Islam.

Sayad Parwez Kambaksh, 23, who was said to have printed the paper off the internet, was sentenced by a three-judge panel in the northern province of Balkh. His family and the National Journalists Union of Afghanistan denounced the verdict, saying that the student had not been represented by a lawyer. He will remain in custody while his case is heard by the first of two appeal courts.

Meanwhile, the United States has backed the appointment of Lord Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon as the UN Special Representative to Afghanistan.

The UN had been expected to announce his appointment but there have been reports that President Karzai is concerned about the amount of authority that the new envoy would have. Lord Ashdown will co-ordinate the roles of the UN and Nato, and possibly the EU, to try to boost reconstruction efforts and security. (AP, AFP)



From today's Times

Offline Alan

  • The Newshound
  • Cast Of Thousands
  • ******
  • Posts: 4551
    • View Profile
Re: Not In My Name!
« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2008, 04:43:49 PM »
It was an innocent infatuation but five months after Rand, a student of English at Basra University, met Paul, a 22-year-old soldier posted to southern Iraq, she was dead. She was stamped on, suffocated and stabbed by her father. Several brutal knife wounds punctured her slender, bruised body - from her face to her feet. He had done it, he proclaimed to the neighbours who soon gathered round, to 'cleanse his honour'.

And as Rand was put into the ground, without ceremony, her uncles spat on her covered corpse because she had brought shame on the family. Her crime was the worst they could possibly imagine - she had fallen in love with a British soldier and dared to talk to him in public.

Rand was murdered last month. That the relationship was innocent was no defence. She had been seen conversing intimately with Paul. It was enough to condemn her, because he was British, a Christian, 'the invader', and the enemy.

Her father, Abdel-Qader Ali, learned of their friendship and enraged headed straight home to demand an explanation from his daughter.

'When he entered the house, his eyes were bloodshot and he was trembling,' said Rand's mother, Leila Hussein, tears streaming down her face as she recalled her daughter's murder. 'I got worried and tried to speak to him but he headed straight for our daughter's room and he started to yell at her.'

'He asked if it was true that she was having an affair with a British soldier. She started to cry. She was nervous and desperate. He got hold of her hair and started thumping her again and again.

'I screamed and called out for her two brothers so they could get their father away from her. But when he told them the reason, instead of saving her they helped him end her life,' she said.

She said Ali used his feet to press down hard on his own daughter's throat until she was suffocated. Then he called for a knife and began to cut at her body. All the time he was calling out that his honour was being cleansed.

'I just couldn't stand it. I fainted.' recalled Leila. 'I woke up in a blur later with dozens of neighbours at home and the local police.'

According to Leila, her husband was initially arrested. 'But he was released two hours later because it was an "honour killing". And, unfortunately, that is something to be proud of for any Iraqi man.'

At the police station where the father was held Sergeant Ali Jabbar told The Observer last week: 'Not much can be done when we have an "honour killing" case. You are in a Muslim society and women should live under religious laws.

'The father has very good contacts inside the Basra government and it wasn't hard for him to be released and what he did to be forgotten. Sorry but I cannot say more about the case.'

Rand, considered impure, was given only a simple burial. To show their repugnance at her alleged crime, her family cancelled the traditional mourner ceremony.

Two weeks after the murder, Leila left Ali. She could no longer bear to live under the same roof as her daughter's killer and asked for a divorce. 'I was beaten and had my arm broken by him,' she said. 'No man can accept being left by a woman in Iraq. But I would prefer to be killed than sleep in the same bed with a man who was able to do what he did to his own daughter, who, over the years, had only given him unconditional love.'

Now she works for a women's organisation campaigning against honour killings. 'I just want to try to stop other girls having the same fate as my beloved Rand,' said Leila who is forced to move regularly from friend to friend

A colleague of Leila's said: 'We prefer to change places each two weeks to prevent targeting. She has been threatened again by her husband's family and is very scared.'

Throughout her friendship with Paul, Rand confided in only one person, her best friend Zeinab, 19. 'She used to say that her charity work had more than one meaning now. From the first time she saw him, she was helping needy families but also that Paul was helping her. With just a simple, caring smile, he was able to give her the sense of love, making her forget all about the hard and depressing life in Iraq,' said Zeinab.

The two teenagers had spent hours talking about him,' she said. 'She loved to speak about his blond hair, his honey eyes, his white skin and the sweet way he had of speaking.

'He was very different from the local men who usually are tough and illiterate. I was in heaven when she was speaking about him. Everything looked so beautiful.

'But, I always had to remind Rand that she was a Muslim and her family was never going to accept her marrying a Christian, British soldier'.

'Unfortunately she never wanted to hear me. Her mind was very far from reality, but closer to an impossible dream.'

Paul gave Rand gifts. She kept them - and him - secret from her family and asked Zeinab to take care of these small tokens of his affection for her. He gave her a charming cuddly animal. 'She couldn't take it home so she asked me to keep it for her,' said Zeinab. 'It's hard to look at it every day,' she said.

Rand told Zeinab she and Paul had met only four times, though Zeinab doubts this. Their meetings were always in public and through the voluntary work that Paul carried out as part of his regiment's peacekeeping duties.

Rand had an excellent command of English and spoke it fluently and that, said Zeinab, allowed them to communicate freely without others around understanding what they were saying. 'She was the only one who could speak English and it made it easier for her to get closer "through words" to him,' she said.

Soon Rand began giving different and elaborate excuses to her family to enable her to continue her voluntary work. She persuaded her father that her work was vital in helping families. And she began paying daily visits to displacement camps, local aid agencies and hospitals in the hope of bumping into Paul.

'He used to tell her all about England. She told me his father had died from a disease and that it was a really sad story,' said Zeinab.

'She liked to speak about how couples could live together in his country. He told her that flowers could be found on every corner and he promised to take her one day to buy some in the streets of London. She was a fan of London and he told her about all the tourists attractions there.'

'But the thing she used to like talking about best was how he praised her beauty and her intelligence. She told me he called her "princess".'

Despite knowing how dangerous the consequences of her actions could be, and the punishment she faced if caught, her passion for Paul grew stronger, said Zeinab. 'She never did anything more than talk to him. She was proud to be a virgin and had a dream to give herself to the man she loved only after her marriage. But she was seen as an animal,' said Zeinab.

'What they did to her was ugly and pathetic. Rand was just a young girl with romantic dreams. She always kept her religion close to her heart. She would never even hurt a petal on a rose.'

Last year 133 women were killed in Basra - 47 of them for so-called 'honour killings', according to the Basra Security Committee. Out of those 47 cases there have been only three convictions for murder.

Since January this year, 36 women have been killed.

From today's Guardian....


Offline Alan

  • The Newshound
  • Cast Of Thousands
  • ******
  • Posts: 4551
    • View Profile
Re: Not In My Name!
« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2008, 05:37:12 PM »
From today's Guardian, doesn't sound like we are making change happen in Iraq....

'My daughter deserved to die for falling in love'

Two weeks ago, The Observer revealed how 17-year-old student Rand Abdel-Qader was beaten to death by her father after becoming infatuated with a British soldier in Basra. In this remarkable interview, Abdel-Qader Ali explains why he is unrepentant - and how police backed his actions. Afif Sarhan in Basra and Caroline Davies report
Afif Sarhan in Basra and Caroline Davies The Observer, Sunday May 11 2008 Article historyAbout this articleClose This article appeared in the Observer on Sunday May 11 2008 on p8 of the News section. It was last updated at 00:03 on May 11 2008. For Abdel-Qader Ali there is only one regret: that he did not kill his daughter at birth. 'If I had realised then what she would become, I would have killed her the instant her mother delivered her,' he said with no trace of remorse.

Two weeks after The Observer revealed the shocking story of Rand Abdel-Qader, 17, murdered because of her infatuation with a British solider in Basra, southern Iraq, her father is defiant. Sitting in the front garden of his well-kept home in the city's Al-Fursi district, he remains a free man, despite having stamped on, suffocated and then stabbed his student daughter to death.

Abdel-Qader, 46, a government employee, was initially arrested but released after two hours. Astonishingly, he said, police congratulated him on what he had done. 'They are men and know what honour is,' he said.

Rand, who was studying English at Basra University, was deemed to have brought shame on her family after becoming infatuated with a British soldier, 22, known only as Paul.

She died a virgin, according to her closest friend Zeinab. Indeed, her 'relationship' with Paul, which began when she worked as a volunteer helping displaced families and he was distributing water, appears to have consisted of snatched conversations over less than four months. But the young, impressionable Rand fell in love with him, confiding her feelings and daydreams to Zeinab, 19.

It was her first youthful infatuation and it would be her last. She died on 16 March after her father discovered she had been seen in public talking to Paul, considered to be the enemy, the invader and a Christian. Though her horrified mother, Leila Hussein, called Rand's two brothers, Hassan, 23, and Haydar, 21, to restrain Abdel-Qader as he choked her with his foot on her throat, they joined in. Her shrouded corpse was then tossed into a makeshift grave without ceremony as her uncles spat on it in disgust.

'Death was the least she deserved,' said Abdel-Qader. 'I don't regret it. I had the support of all my friends who are fathers, like me, and know what she did was unacceptable to any Muslim that honours his religion,' he said.

Sitting on a chair by his front door and surrounded by the gerberas and white daisies he had planted in the family garden, Abel-Qader attempted to justify his actions.

'I don't have a daughter now, and I prefer to say that I never had one. That girl humiliated me in front of my family and friends. Speaking with a foreign solider, she lost what is the most precious thing for any woman. 'People from western countries might be shocked, but our girls are not like their daughters that can sleep with any man they want and sometimes even get pregnant without marrying. Our girls should respect their religion, their family and their bodies.

'I have only two boys from now on. That girl was a mistake in my life. I know God is blessing me for what I did,' he said, his voice swelling with pride. 'My sons are by my side, and they were men enough to help me finish the life of someone who just brought shame to ours.'

Abdel-Qader, a Shia, says he was released from the police station 'because everyone knows that honour killings sometimes are impossible not to commit'. Chillingly, he said: 'The officers were by my side during all the time I was there, congratulating me on what I had done.' It's a statement that, if true, provides an insight into how vast the gulf remains between cultures in Iraq and between the Basra police the British army that trains them.

Sources have indicated that Abdel-Qader, who works in the health department, has been asked to leave because of the bad publicity, yet he will continue to draw a salary.

And it has been alleged by one senior unnamed official in the Basra governorate that he has received financial support by a local politician to enable him to 'disappear' to Jordan for a few weeks, 'until the story has been forgotten' - the usual practice in the 30-plus cases of 'honour' killings that have been registered since January alone.

Such treatment seems common in Basra, where militias have partial control, especially in the districts on the outskirts where Abdel-Qader lives.

While government security forces and British troops have control over the centre, around the fringes militants can still be seen everywhere on the streets or at the checkpoints they have erected. And they have imposed strict laws of behaviour for all the local people, including what clothing should be worn and what religious practices should be observed. There are reports of men having their hands cut off for looting and women being killed for prostitution.

Homosexuality is punishable by death, a sentence Abdel-Qader approves of with a passion. 'I have alerted my two sons. They will have the same end [as Rand] if they become contaminated with any gay relationship. These crimes deserve death - death in the name of God,' he said.

He said his daughter's 'bad genes were passed on from her mother'. Rand's mother, 41, remains in hiding after divorcing her husband in the immediate aftermath of the killing, living in fear of retribution from his family. She also still bears the scars of the severe beating he inflicted on her, breaking her arm in the process, when she told him she was going. 'They cannot accept me leaving him. When I first left I went to a cousin's home, but every day they were delivering notes to my door saying I was a prostitute and deserved the same death as Rand,' she said.

'She was killed by animals. Every night when go to bed I remember the face of Rand calling for help while her father and brothers ended her life,' she said, tears streaming down her face.

She was nervous, clearly terrified of being found, and her eyes constantly turned towards the window as she spoke. 'Rand told me about the soldier, but she swore it was just a friendship.

'She said she spoke with him because she was the only English speaker. I raised her in a religious manner and she never went out alone until she joined the university and then later when she was doing aid work.

'Even now, I cannot believe my ex-husband was able to kill our daughter. He wasn't a bad person. During our 24 years of marriage, he was never aggressive. But on that day, he was a different person.'

The mother is now trying to raise enough money to escape abroad. 'I miss my two boys,' she said. 'But they have sent a message saying that I am wrong for defending Rand and that I should go back home and live like a blessed Muslim woman,' said Leila, who is now volunteering with a local organisation campaigning for better protection for women in Basra.

One of those running the organisation, who did not want to be identified, said that Rand's case was similar to so many reported in Basra, with the only difference being she was in love with a foreigner, rather than an Iraqi.

'There isn't too much to say. Rand is dead. It is a tragedy and will be a tragedy for many other families in Iraq in the days to come.

'According to information we have been given, some from Rand's colleague, we have doubts that her love was reciprocated. We have the impression that Rand was in love, but the English soldier wasn't. But, for a girl to be paid nice compliments about her beauty and her intelligence, it was enough for her to think she was in love.

'She isn't here any more for her mother to ask any of the questions she would like to. Rand's case had repercussions because she fell in love with a foreigner. But what about the other girls murdered through "honour" killings because they fell in love with some of a different sect, or lost their virginity, or were forced to become prostitutes?'

Rand's mother used to call her 'Rose'. 'That was my nickname for her because when she was born she was so beautiful,' she said.

'Now, my lovely Rose is in her grave. But, God will make her father pay, either in this world ... or in the world after.'

Offline Alan

  • The Newshound
  • Cast Of Thousands
  • ******
  • Posts: 4551
    • View Profile
8 Year Old Girl Denied Divorce
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2008, 09:20:18 AM »
FRom today's Guardian - ain't these people our allies?

An eight-year old Saudi Arabian girl who was married off by her father to a 58-year-old man has been told she cannot divorce her husband until she reaches puberty.

Lawyer Abdu Jtili said the divorce petition was filed by the unnamed girl's divorced mother in August after the marriage contract was signed by her father and the groom. "The judge has dismissed the plea because she [the mother] does not have the right to file, and ordered that the plea should be filed by the girl herself when she reaches puberty," lawyer Abdullah Jtili told the AFP news agency.

The case was handled by a court in Qasim province, north of the Saudi capital Riyadh. The girl does not know she is married, said Jtili, adding that he will appeal.

In many child marriages, girls are given away to older men in return for dowries or following the custom by which a father promises his daughters and sons to marriage while still children. But the issue is complicated by different interpretations of sharia law and a lack of legal certainty.

"There is confusion in Saudi Arabia over the fundamental question of what constitutes adulthood," said Clarisa Bencomo of Human Rights Watch. "There is also vast judicial discretion." The case appears to fit a pattern of divorced fathers using their children to take revenge against their ex-wives. Mothers usually only have custody while the children are young.

Relatives said the marriage had not been consummated and that the girl was still living with her mother. They said that the father had set a verbal condition by which the marriage was not to be consummated until the girl turns 18 - although it was unclear how this could be enforced. The father agreed to marry off his daughter for a dowry of 30,000 riyals (£5,400) as he was facing financial problems.

Bencomo dismissed the idea that the girl would be able to file for divorce once she reached puberty since there was no standard definition of this. In addition, Saudi judges often insist that even adult women speak to them through a male guardian or lawyer.

No figures are available for the number of arranged marriages involving pre-adolescents in Saudi Arabia, where the strictly conservative Wahhabi version of Sunni Islam holds sway and polygamy is common. But human rights groups say they are aware of many such cases.

Senior clerics, including Sheikh Abdul-Aziz Al-Sheikh, the kingdom's grand mufti, have denounced child marriage. But it is still prevalent in conservative areas. The Shura council recently defined adulthood as starting at age 18 but objections prevented it from being ratified as required by the council of ministers.