Author Topic: Hugh Cornwell News  (Read 17575 times)

Offline Uli

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Offline Uli

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Re: Hugh Cornwell News
« Reply #61 on: August 12, 2017, 01:37:41 PM »
Looks like Hugh Cornwell has been busy doing "podcasts" about his "hobby", movies and film music...
This is from his FB:
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Hugh's new website about the world of film and film music, MRDEMILLEFM is now live. Visit the site at http://www.mrdemillefm.com/ - with the debut of four new shows: one on Hedy Lamarr's career, one on Lee Marvin, one on Ernest Borgnine, and an interview with Sir David Puttnam.

http://mrdemillefm.com/about/

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Q: SO, TELL ME ABOUT MRDEMILLEFM.
A: MRDEMILLEFM is something of a passion of mine. I've always been interested in cinema. It's a great escape from the world of music for me. A few years ago I set up SOUNDTRAXFM, an online streaming site, which has now been replaced by MRDEMILLEFM.

Q: WILL THERE STILL BE INTERVIEWS AND THEMED SHOWS?
A: Most definitely. On launch day, August 12th.....

Q: THAT'S THE ANNIVERSARY OF CECIL B. DEMILLE'S BIRTHDAY, I UNDERSTAND?
A: Quite right. On August 12th, there will be 4 new shows available: one on Hedy Lamarr's career, one on Lee Marvin, one on Ernest Borgnine, and an interview with Sir David Puttnam. The show on Ernest Borgnine is narrated by John Cooper Clarke, who is just as fanatical about film as I am.
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Offline Fred21

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Re: Hugh Cornwell News
« Reply #62 on: December 12, 2017, 09:35:11 PM »
Hugh announced as support for Wilko's May dates.
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Offline Fred21

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Re: Hugh Cornwell News
« Reply #63 on: May 23, 2018, 05:28:02 PM »
Hugh interviews Debbie Harry for his film website:

http://mrdemillefm.com/program/debbie-harry/
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Offline Uli

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Re: Hugh Cornwell News
« Reply #64 on: August 23, 2018, 12:56:37 PM »
New album "Monster" is on the way:
http://smarturl.it/HCMonster

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One of the most celebrated songwriters of his generation, Hugh Cornwell will release his new album ĎMonsterí through Sony Music on 5th October 2018.

 The album features 10 tracks written about some of the most remarkable, and indeed infamous, people of the 20th Century, both heroes and villians. Alongside these luminaries, he took inspiration initially from an extraordinary lady who swam every day in Hampstead ponds, his 98-year-old mother, Winifred. To locals, she was a hero who swam five or six times a day in all weathers, to Hughís family, she was the villain who kept them all in check. This juxtaposition started Hugh off on his creation of the album with the song La Grande Dame.

 The album takes its name from the eponymous track Monster, Hughís love-letter to the genius model-maker and animator Ray Harryhausen who blazed a trail with films such as Jason & the Argonauts and Clash of the Titans, paving the way for Spielberg, Lucas et al to follow his lead.

 Cornwell is, of course, no stranger to writing about illustrious and mythic characters, having penned The Stranglersí evergreen 1977 hit, No More Heroes, with its references to Leon Trotsky, Lenin and Sancho Panza. Forty-one years later, the subjects he tackles on ĎMonsterí include everyone from music legends Lou Reed (on Mr. Leather) and Mose Allison (Mosiní), to 70s stuntman Evel Knievel (Pure Evel), 1940s Hollywood star Hedy Lamarr (The Most Beautiful Girl In Hollywood), Sgt Bilko star Phil Silvers (Bilko), Italian dictator Benito Mussolini (Duce Coochie Man) and Zimbabwe ex-president Robert Mugabe (Robert).

ďThese are people who have defied categorisation,Ē he explains of his choices. ďIíve spent my whole life trying to defy categorisation. If someone wants to put me into some sort of a box, I'll do my best to defy it. You could call it being obstreperous, but itís also got something to do with being drawn to people who are dichotomous.Ē
http://www.hughcornwell.com/hughcornwellnews.php?lang=en-GB
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Offline Fred21

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Re: Hugh Cornwell News
« Reply #65 on: August 15, 2019, 01:45:25 PM »
Latest newsletter from Uncle Hugh:

MRDEMILLEFM PODCASTS

Hughís website about cinema and the people who make movies happen, MrDemilleFM, has changed from a streaming platform, to being available as podcasts, via your chosen podcast provider. The first Podcasts have now gone live so please visit www.mrdemillefm.com to find out more.

ďTwo years ago, MrDemilleFM became a reality Ė a website streaming shows about cinema and the people who make it happen.

Now, on Cecil B. Demilleís birthday, I am delighted to announce that after a lot of work it has become a podcast. Why is this? Simply because of public demand.

Youíll now be able to enjoy the shows whilst on the move and doing other things

Every month thereíll be three shows available as podcasts, either two new ones and one archive, or one new one and two archive.

About 50% of the archive has been taken down in preparation for their transformation into podcasts, and once theyíve all been made available, the other 50% will be taken down and transformed.

Itís a very exciting moment and I do hope youíll enjoy moving into the future with us.Ē
Hugh Cornwell, August 2019

To be informed when new podcasts are added, follow @MrDeMilleFM on twitter or subscribe on the website of your favourite platform. The www.mrdemillefm.com August Podcasts are:

Episode 1- Brian De Palma Ė The prolific career of Brian De Palma, who has been labelled a Hitchcock copyist, but deserves recognition. Still going after all these years.
Episode 2- Sir David Puttnam Interview Ė Arguably, the most successful British movie producer talks of his lifelong love of cinema, his illustrious career and his inspirations.
Episode 3- Laurence Harvey Ė Cold, good looking & louche: this is the Laurence Harvey story, an actor whose rise coincided with the new British cinema of the 60ís.
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Offline Uli

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Re: Hugh Cornwell News
« Reply #66 on: September 19, 2019, 08:40:12 AM »
New interview and it's a long one!

https://louderthanwar.com/stranglers-legend-hugh-cornwell-goes-below-skin-deep-with-dave-jennings-talking-solo-career-writing-and-how-he-feels-about-the-bands-continuation-without-him/

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LTW: Your most recent album, Monster, is an album in the proper sense, where you examine individuals who are important to, or fascinate you. Did you plan that before you started writing, or did it evolve?

HC: No it turned into that. My mother passed away a few years ago and I wanted to create something for her as a tribute and writing a song seemed the perfect way to do it. It turned out really well, La Grande Dame, but I still didnít have the idea of writing about other people. However, Iím a film fanatic and was watching a film about Evel Knievel, played by George Hamilton and it was actually really good. I thought it seemed an amazing life so I researched further and the film was pretty accurate. I was astounded that no one had ever written a song about him, especially when you consider the connection between Rock Ďní Roll and motor biking, so I was inspired by that.
So I had one song about my Mum and one about Evel Knievel and slowly I could see what was happening so I started to think about other people who may be interesting to write songs about and they presented themselves. Either I would watch a film they were in or there is the story I have about an abortive meeting I was to have with Lou Reed. We were going to meet up in New York but we both got sick with a very similar bug, we were both bed-ridden. It never happened that we were in the same area again and he then died so that lost opportunity to meet him became more important as Iíve always been a fan of what he did, so I wrote Mr. Leather.
I then started to ponder on all these people and what had they had in common. I was originally going to call the album La Grande Dame as I thought it had a nice symmetry with La Folie, and Iím a quarter French anyway, which a lot of people donít know, but a lot of people said an album title should be more in your face. The plan was then to call it ĎVillainsí as thatís what they all were. My Mum was a likeable villain, she was very strict and draconian but there was something very endearing about her so I had no problem about calling her a villain. So it was all set to be called ĎVillainsí but then Queens of the Stone Age brought out an album called ĎVillainsí and you canít have two albums called the same thing coming out so close together. One of the songs was called ĎMonsterí and that seemed a pretty appropriate title and it all started from writing about my Mum.

LTW: Youíre out on tour again in November. You often visit smaller venues and towns that are not on the major circuit. How is the experience of touring and playing live for you now?

HC: Part of it is necessity, as since I gave up the name of The Stranglers, I donít get the size of venue that they do with that name. I did voluntarily give up the name, I had a choice when I left whether I wanted it and I could have said to the others you canít use it because itís owned by the four of us. But I said ďI donít want it, itís got too much baggage associated with it and Iíd rather not have itĒ.
I was feeling stifled creatively by what the name signified so I thought, ďIím better off without itĒ.
Therefore, because I havenít had the name, Iíve had to step down in the size of venue Iím playing, quite understandably, and I go to smaller towns which has been great for me. I think people appreciate it so it has a silver lining. In fact, the more I hear about big tours and gigs that people canít see properly, the more Iím happy to play the venues I do. Most people in a stadium may as well be watching it on video as they spend their whole time watching on a screen. The light shows have to provide more and more to make up for that shortfall of the live experience and it all seems to be getting further and further away from what itís all supposed to be about. That is, people on a stage making music and people close enough to appreciate whatís happening on that stage, not having to use binoculars because they are so far away.
The Stranglers did a few shows of that size back in the day and while they were fun, I wouldnít want to be doing it regularly. You hear about Fleetwood Mac and The Rolling Stones going out on these tours and every day itís these massive places and it must get so boring for them. Probably secretly theyíd admit that they find it boring too.
We were in New York once and had three days off and a band I absolutely loved were playing round the corner. I wonít name them but. I could not believe my luck so I went to see them two nights running. The first night was absolute bliss; they played all the songs I wanted to hear, it was a smaller venue that wasnít full so plenty of space and I couldnít wait to get back the next night. To my disappointment, every moment that they made contact with the audience, they said exactly the same thing as the night before, it was like a script. It ruined it for me. I vowed then that, in or out of The Stranglers, I was never going to repeat myself on stage because itís the first stepping stone to mediocrity and to boredom.
...

LTW: You separate your solo and Stranglers catalogue in your set into two parts of the show. How does that work for you?
HC: I think what separating the two parts does really is highlight the strength of The Stranglers catalogue, or at least the part I was involved in. I canít speak for anything theyíve done since I left because Iíve never listened to anything theyíve done. I just donít want to go there; I donít want to be asked what I think about their work since Iíve left as I donít know how I would think about it. Iíd rather not listen to it. Iím sorry to the guys for that as they may well put a lot of work into it but Iím just not interested.
To qualify that though, I donít listen to any music by anybody. I gave up listening to music in the same way, as ever since I started writing books, I donít read anymore, I just canít get into it. I was an avid reader and have read very widely so itís not like Iím not interested, itís just that I canít involve myself in them since I first wrote ĎWindow on the Worldí. Musically, I donít know how people can keep up, how do you decide what you are going to listen to? The only time I listen to ďnew musicĒ is when I watch a film, a song is in there that I like, and I want to hear more of. But given the choice, I would not listen to new music. Iím so involved with learning old catalogue stuff, of which there is a lot, I just like a bit of peace and quiet when Iím not in the rehearsal room or the studio or on tour. I just donít really want to listen to anything.
Music is ageless anyway. Weíre still listening to Bach and Beethoven so weíll be listening to rock music for many years to come.
...
LTW: So, how do you feel about The Stranglers carrying on without you?
HC: This is a completely jaw-dropping statement but Iíve suddenly realised that Iím very happy for The Stranglers to carry on without me. I love the fact that they are out there doing it, because it shows that the catalogue is that strong.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2019, 08:53:58 AM by Uli »
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