Author Topic: UK arts workers fall through support cracks  (Read 471 times)

Offline Uli

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UK arts workers fall through support cracks
« on: June 19, 2020, 09:22:49 AM »
https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2020/jun/18/seismic-torturous-and-gruelling-forgotten-uk-arts-workers-fall-through-support-cracks

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'Seismic, torturous and gruelling': forgotten UK arts workers fall through support cracks

Freelance workers in the UK’s creative industries have spoken of the devastating psychological toll of being “forgotten” and “ignored” after falling through the cracks in government support schemes.

The shadow cultural industries minister, Tracy Brabin, said the past three months had been “absolutely seismic, torturous and mentally gruelling” for many freelancers, with little apparent appetite in government to support them.

Brabin, an actor for three decades before entering parliament, said many felt utterly despondent after months with no income. “There are thousands of people looking at the rest of the year and wondering whether they are going to have to remortgage the house, move back in with their parents, or not buy the home they had saved for. These are seismic changes in people’s lives,” she said.
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Offline Fred21

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TV SM!TH - for the beer and the company! (AND great songs too!)

Offline Fred21

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TV SM!TH - for the beer and the company! (AND great songs too!)

Offline Uli

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Re: UK arts workers fall through support cracks
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2020, 09:56:36 AM »
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/aug/15/the-terrible-plight-of-music-event-staff-coronavirus-pandemic

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The vast majority of road crew – a broad designation that includes tour managers, instrument technicians, sound engineers, lighting engineers, bus drivers, merchandise sellers and even caterers, plus those working in the other ancillary industries on which touring depends – are self-employed. They go out on tour and are paid for that tour by the artist. When there is no work, there is no money. Since March, those who are self-employed have had to rely on grants from the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS), savings, universal credit, or on getting other jobs. Others who had set themselves up as limited companies, with themselves as directors, have been able to go on furlough, but times are still beyond tough: there is an existential crisis in the road crew world.
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In July, Boris Johnson announced gig venues could reopen with social distancing from 1 August, but reversed the decision with one day to go. Culture secretary Oliver Dowden has announced reopening can begin today, but with social distancing in place, it won’t be viable for many venues.
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Those who plan to return to the road know everything will be different, and harder. Major promoters have told me they expect consumer confidence in live music to be so low they will have to cut ticket prices, which will mean lower artist fees and thus either fewer crew or lower crew wages; crew members expect the return of live music to be accompanied by freelancers desperate for work undercutting each others’ rates.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2020, 09:59:20 AM by Uli »
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